Philly.Net Code Camp 2013.1

11. May 2013 10:32 by cagomez in   //  Tags:   //   Comments (2)

Thanks to everyone who attended “The Real-Time Web with ASP.NET, SignalR, and JavaScript”.  I‘m happy to promote the idea of a stateful, realtime, and programmable web.

The Code and Slides are available for download.

Code

Slides

The Code demonstrates ASP.NET SignalR on a client and server.  The Client uses ASP.NET MVC 4 but it’s primary purpose is to serve client code, not use MVC-ness.  The Server is a console app that embeds a Javascript engine (Noesis Javascript) and creates and hosts the SignalR Hub.

This code download DOES include the AntiXSS library because I didn’t fear the user input to the chat console in the presentation and you should always fear user input!

My next move is to get this on GitHub and continue to expand it into a better and more useful demonstration of SignalR and the new realtime web.

See this post for a brain dump of material I used to put this together, including links to the various JavaScript engines, the single page application layout I used, various HTML5 Canvas engines.\\

Windows 8 Camp - Harrisburg Area Community College

16. March 2013 10:33 by cagomez in   //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)

Thanks to everyone for attending the Windows 8 Camp at Harrisburg Community College.  I was happy to present on JavaScript development for Windows Store and also on How Windows Store Apps run.

I also want to extend a hearty thank you for bearing with us as we worked through the difficulties to get the camp started.

Instead of posting the code and slides like usual, I want to direct you to the Windows 8 "Camp In A Box" which is the same content.  The samples and slides were pulled from the presentations and labs in that series.  It is preferred that I direct you to the full package rather than give you what I culled to fit in fifty minute presentations.

Windows 8 "Camp In A Box"

The Windows 8 "Camp In A Box" is a download that gives you all the content that can jumpstart your learning (or speaking) about Windows 8 Store development.  You'll recognize my content from this package.  You can download it for C#/XAML development or JavaScript development for Windows 8.

You can find it here:
Windows 8 Camp In a Box

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Philly.NET - The New Web: Stateful, Realtime, Programmable

19. February 2013 22:46 by cagomez in   //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)

Thanks to everyone who came to see my talk about the tools we have to make the web realtime, stateful, and programmable.

Slides download - The New Web Slides

Code download - TheNewWeb.zip

This download includes the NuGet packages (I didn't enable NuGet package restore).  You should be able to open the GameServer in VS2012 and start it before opening and starting the MapClient.

Remember that you'll want the latest Firefox or Chrome or Internet Explorer 9/10. 

And a live demonstration of the code is online at http://spaceshot.net.  Open two browsers and move tokens around right now!

CMAP Fall 2012 Code Camp - The Stateful, Realtime Web

1. December 2012 10:45 by cagomez in   //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)

Thanks to everyone who attended my talk about the Stateful and Realtime web.  It's a little bit more than "another SignalR" talk, as I am focusing on building a game state server that your web client connects to so players can see updates in real time.

Code and Slides

Presentation Slides (PowerPoint 911KB)

Code (2.0MB)

Notes on the code download: My goal was that you could download this, run the GameStateServer and let it start, then run the MapClient and you would be up and running.  The solutions are VS 2012 solutions with my source control bindings removed.  The NuGet packages are not in here so NuGet Package Restore should pick them up for you on your build attempt.  IISExpress should launch for MapClient.

 

Here are links to many things we discussed in the talk:

Single Page Application Layout

Steve Sanderson's Blog - I liked how this looked and worked and for someone new to hardcore CSS, I understood what it was doing to divide and subdivide "rows" and "columns"

HTML5 canvas "engines" or "toolkits"

EaselJS - part of CreateJS. Designed to implement a "game loop" and ease your using a raw canvas

KineticJS - HTML5 Canvas framework

ImpactJS - Focused on game development using canvas. They support iOS and Win8 JS too.

Realtime Web Frameworks

SignalR - Of interest to the ASP.NET developer because it is about to be officially part of ASP.NET. Open source and supported.

node.js - Javascript runtime with massive community support (via Node Package Manager). Should be able to use socket.io and nowjs packages to do what SignalR does.

Javascript Engines

Noesis Javascript.NET - Exposes the Google V8 engine via .NET. Does require MS VC++ runtime. Fast and thorough. Simple to use.

Jurassic - A .NET implementation of ECMAScript. Not as fast. Also not as simple to use, but isn't wrapping a C++ implementation, either.

Jint - Javascript Interpreter for .NET.  I got this implemented, but it would not run the basic script you see in my "immediate window". I gave up trying to figure out why.  YMMV.

Hosting languages in .NET

Dynamic Languages 101 - Ted Neward discusses hosting several dynamic languages like Lua, Scheme, Prolog.

Hosting C# using Roslyn - Compiler as a service is coming.  Maybe you'd like to just keep writing C# or VB?

Philly.Net Users Group – Code and Slides

11. July 2012 09:13 by cagomez in   //  Tags:   //   Comments (1)

I spoke at the Philly.Net User Group in June and I want to thank the group for hosting me and for the enthusiasm from the folks who came to see how to build games using XNA.

I had some problems with my web server and provider so I’ve had to do some rebuilding here at my blog.  But here is where you can find the code and slides for the game we made during the meeting.

Code and Slides on SkyDrive

Public Github Repository

We now know that XNA will be one of the supported development frameworks for Windows Phone 8.  It won’t just be that old Windows Phone 7 SDK games will be supported. The new SDK will have XNA games as a supported project type.

Bouncing on a Trampoline

1. June 2012 08:31 by cagomez in XNA  //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)

I often get hung up on explaining how I make my clown “bounce” on a trampoline in the Circus game that I use in my XNA presentations.  I know I introduce some basic trigonometry that we’ve all long since forgotten.  Considering my lack of engineering degree and poor grades in trig, I always assumed that everyone else in the room would just get it and I could easily move on.

I’ve not always found that to be the case, however.  It turns out, what I am doing seems a little magical to some people and the whole point of my talks is to make game development easy to understand and take the mystery out of it.

So let’s look at how we make a clown a bounce on a trampoline.

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Start With the Game State Management Sample

15. May 2012 09:44 by cagomez in XNA  //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)

Most presentations on XNA, including my own, start at File > New Project.  There are tons of great ones around the web.  Right now I would suggest Bill Reiss’ Intro to XNA tutorial, which is on Part 5 as I write this post.

The tutorial may seem focused on Windows Phone, but the technique of drawing a sprite, handling input, and playing sounds are key to all games, so it’s a good start and I’ll try to continue filling in the gaps for the questions I am hearing at my presentations.

If you have tried looking at my Circus sample that I use in my XNA talks, you’ll see I started with File > New Project, but this isn’t REALLY how you will want to structure your game.  Use this wizard when you are getting started with XNA and just playing around.  But when you decide you want to start looking at something with more features of a full game, start with the Game State Management Sample.

The Game State Management Sample drops you off at essentially the same place, with a game loop and a CornflowerBlue game screen that you simply start adding your code to, but it has all the basic structure of a game that you’ll want to at least consider when you’re thinking of publishing.

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About the author

Chris Gomez has been writing Windows software for about 20 years.  In 1984, an IBM 8088 PC came home. There wasn't much to do with it so he wrote games in BASICA.  This blog is for those of us who've made a career developing software but want to learn to make games.

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