Chris Gomez

Development topics for the indie programmer

Making your first web page at the International Back to School Hackathon

This weekend I attended the We Connect The Dots International Back-To-School Hackathon.  The students made websites dedicated to solving global problems in just 48 hours!  That included the time to learn to make web sites!  This was a great experience and I am really proud of the work that was completed.  The web sites look great and the students are using the same tools and frameworks professionals use!

Here is a link to the official recap by We Connect The Dots.  You'll see the smiling faces of our participants there, too!



After the event is over, you might want to learn more about web development.  I tracked down some good places to get started.  There are great web sites that will help you learn to build web sites and make them more and more awesome with JavaScript.

There’s plenty of resources out there for you to learn to make web pages.  Here’s a nice list to get started:

Places to learn

Codecademy – Learn to code right in your browser.  You can sign up for a new account using your Gmail or Facebook account.

FreeCodeCamp – The idea here is that you complete lessons and then write code to help non-profit organization that need web sites built.

Videos you can watch

Microsoft Virtual Academy courses

Microsoft Virtual Academy is completely free.  If you want, you can use your Microsoft Account to log in.  If you do that, you will get credit for the courses on the site and you earn points.

But I tested not logging in and it all still works (thank you Microsoft!)

There are hundreds of free courses here, but you might like these:

HTML5 & CSS3 Fundamentals: Development for Absolute Beginners

Developing in HTML5 with JavaScript and CSS3 Jump Start

Developng 2D Games with HTML5 – If you master the previous two, you might try this one out.  It’s a little more advanced, but you can learn to make games that work in your web browser or on your phone!

Online editors

You can code right in the web browser using these

Cloud9 – This online editor works right in the browser and you can log in using your GitHub account.  You can save code directly to GitHub and have it deploy to Azure Web Apps in seconds.

CodePen – An online editor where you can test out HTML, CSS, and JavaScript snippets quickly.  Ignore the paid plans and look for the free plan

Reference

http://developer.mozilla.com – This really is the best set of JavaScript documentation on the web.

http://wctdpa.azurewebsites.net – This was the reference site at the Darby, PA site that the kids used to compile “tips and tricks” for how to do different things.

Honorary Hacker

Our Honorary Hacker tells us about her website:

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